How YOU become a pesticide factory

Jeffrey Smith reveals how genetically engineered crops result in gene transfers into the bacteria in the human gut. It means that after eating GMOs, we may have genetically modified proteins inside our own bodies. Even worse, when BT (genetically engineered) corn is consumed, the gene that produces the BT toxin may transfer into the bacteria living in your intestines, turning you into a HUMAN PESTICIDE FACTORY.

The name sounds innocent enough, but these mild-sounding words are used by the food industry as an umbrella term for some pretty horrible stuff, including certain ingredients that come from extreme animal abuse.

The exact definition of natural flavorings & flavors from Title 21, Section 101, part 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations is as follows:

“The term natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional.”

In other words, natural flavors can be pretty much anything approved for use in food.

MSG is sometimes hidden in food with labels that say “No Added MSG,” “No MSG Added,” and “No MSG”

We found the following in 2006 at Trader Joe’s in Chicago:

Imagine ORGANIC Free Range Chicken Broth Ingredients include “natural flavor” — and Imagine doesn’t tell what is in the “natural flavor” and/or provide an analysis of the amount of processed free glutamic acid in their product.

Kitchen Basics Natural Chicken Stock Ingredients include “chicken stock,” “natural flavor,” and “vegetable stocks” — and Kitchen Basics doesn’t tell what is in the “chicken stock,” “natural flavor,” and “vegetable stock,” and/or provide an analysis of the amount of processed free glutamic acid in their product.

Manufacturers are acutely aware that many consumers would prefer not to have MSG (1) in their food.(2) Some manufacturers have responded by using “clean labels,” i.e., labels that contain only ingredient names they think consumers will not recognize as containing MSG — names such as “hydrolyzed soy protein.” Others advertise “No MSG,” “No MSG Added,” or “No Added MSG,” even though their products contain MSG.

Placing “No MSG,” “No MSG Added,” or “No Added MSG” on food labels has been deemed by the FDA to be false and misleading under section (403)(a)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act when the label also lists any hydrolyzed protein as an ingredient since it contains MSG.”(3) Thus, to advertise “No MSG,” “No MSG Added,” or “No Added MSG” when there is processed free glutamic acid (MSG) in a product is illegal.

Following the FDA’s announcement in 1995 that “…FDA considers foods whose labels say “No MSG” or “No Added MSG” to be misleading if the food contains ingredients that are sources of free glutamates, such as hydrolyzed protein,”(7) the incidence of such misleading and deceptive labels regulated by the FDA began to decline. At the same time, similar labels regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) continued proliferating. At the USDA they don’t simply fail to enforce the regulation. The USDA actually approves labels of meat and poultry products that claim “No MSG,” “No MSG Added,” or “No Added MSG” when they contain free glutamic acid.

Clearly, it is false and misleading to claim “No MSG” or “No MSG Added” on a product label when MSG is present, even if it is present as a constituent of an ingredient.

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